Arbutus

Arbutus is a community that is close to downtown but certainly doesn’t feel that way. Filled with trees, this peaceful neighbourhood will have you forgetting just how close to the commotion of the city you really are. It gives off a true aura of what a neighbourhood really is all about. Everyone from students to families and seniors are happy to call Arbutus their home.

Location

To the north you’ll find west 16th and to the south, King Edward; the east and west boundaries are East Boulevard and Quesnel. The neighborhood shows its heritage with a mixture of both old and new dwellings in the area. To this day you can admire the original “Ridge” elevations and if you wander a bit, you can also find the low lying area that was once filled with False Creek sand in the 1940s. This marshy area and the Ridges offer spectacular views of both the North Shore Mountains and the core of downtown.

Schools In The Area

Without having to search far you will find a multitude of schools in the Arbutus area. Within the neighbourhood you have the Trafalgar Elementary School. Just beyond the Arbutus limits are Kitchener Elementary and Carnarvon Elementary. For teenagers, Prince of Wales Secondary School is in the vicinity and if you don’t mind a short drive, there are some private schools close by which include York House, Vancouver College, Crofton House, St. Georges and Little Flower Academy.

History Of The Housing Market

Arbutus features mostly detached single family homes but there are also townhouses and some low-rise and high-rise condo buildings in the area. The older homes of the area can be found among the new developments, which have been built to reflect the older style of the neighbourhood. The growth of the community really took off because of the spillover need for housing from the Dunbar area and the 1905 construction of the streetcar line. The line that was run by BC Electric Company went from Vancouver to Steveston. Most of the houses were built in the 14 years between 1946 and 1960.

Recreation Opportunities

Anyone looking for outdoor fun won’t have any problems finding it in Arbutus as it is riddled with parks and green spaces for people and animals alike to enjoy. The largest of these is Trafalgar Park. The amenities include everything that would be needed for sports and games; from soccer to baseball and even ultimate frisbee. The park even features some areas that are dog friendly where a leash isn’t required as well as walking and jogging paths. There are also two community centers that are just out of the Arbutus boundaries – both of them offer many choices for recreational activities. Carnarvon Park is also located in Arbutus. It has many recreational activities to choose from and features multiple sports fields, a playground for the children and even a fitness circuit. Nature enthusiasts enjoy the variety of trees including ash, crab apple, plum and hornbeam. The beauty in the park makes it an excellent choice for an evening stroll in the summer.

Restaurants & Shopping

Arbutus has no strip malls or big outlet stores, giving it a true community feel. That doesn’t mean they’ve tossed out the old value “shop in your neighbourhood”. You can find small areas of retail with stores such as Choices (a grocery market) and even a Starbucks, and the way they are situated really makes them fit in with the historic feel rather than stand out and look out of place. You can find many quiet and wonderful restaurants in the local area, including La Buca – a world renowned five star restaurant.

Transportation Options

While Arbutus is a neighborhood that can boast about its beautiful trees and green areas, it’s close enough to the downtown core that it isn’t much of a drive to get there or even to the airport. Arbutus is situated in a location that is common to all of the major transportation routes. This kind of central, easy access is not something many neighbourhoods can say they offer.

Cambie

Cambie has become a rather popular neighborhood in the Metro Vancouver area— thanks to the underground Canada Line. It is truly a melting pot as it attracts people of all ages, ethnic groups and socioeconomic status. The area known as Cambie was part of an original land grant given to the Canadian Pacific Railway in the 1800s. It was named after Henry Cambie who was a CPR engineer in charge of the railway’s western division. Douglas Park on West 22nd has some history to it as well. It belonged to William Mackie, a gold miner who was a settler that wasn’t native to the area. He came in with the first wave of immigration around 1874. He claimed 65 hectares of land that was formerly an elk pasture as his own, which is now the park.

Schools In The Area

There are a variety of schools available to the young people of the community. For the younger members, Edith Cavell Elementary and Emily Carr Elementary are in the immediate area. The secondary school zoned for the older teens is Eric Hamber Secondary School. Something you will find in Cambie this isn’t common in this part of Vancouver is the availability of two French schools—Ecole Secondaire Jules Verne and Rose-Des-Vents are both operated by the Conseil Scolaire Francophone de la Colombie-Britannique. There are also options for private institutions including York House, Little Flower Academy and St. Georges Academy—all of which are a 10 minute or less drive from the area.

Location

Cambie is home to one of the city’s largest parks, Queen Elizabeth Park. The west and east borders are Oak Street to Ontario Street. The northern border is 16th Avenue and 41st Avenue is the southern. Vancouver’s highest point and geographical center is found at the southeast portion of Cambie.

History Of The Housing Market

In Cambie you will find a variety of housing. Mixed in with condo, low-rise and mid-rise rental buildings are a variety of single family homes. In the northern tip you can find quite a large amount of heritage houses from around 1910-1920. On Heather Street is an example of one with a 1912 Tudor style building which is currently housing a RCMP training facility. Many of the heritage homes have been renovated and a large number of them are made to accommodate rental suites for young professionals and students of Langara College as the area is close to both the school and downtown.

Recreation Opportunities

The main spots for recreation in Cambie lie in Douglas Park, Riley Park and Queen Elizabeth Park. Homeowners in the community are very lucky to have so many options in their own neighborhood. Douglas Park Community Center is among the most popular neighborhood recreational facilities in Vancouver. The building was at one time the spot for the original Douglas Park Pavilion which was still standing from 1928 until 1966 when the new Community Center was built. The off-leash areas for dogs to roam with their owners are plenty — many found at Douglas Park, 37th& Oak and Queen Elizabeth Park. Residents of Cambie have so many recreational options including but not limited to soccer, field hockey, baseball, football, dog walking and walking/jogging.

Restaurants & Shopping

Oakridge Center is just outside the southern tip and in the northern vicinity are two corners of shopping malls found at both Oak and King Edward Street. There are plenty of restaurants to choose from along Cambie Street as well. There are a lot of different amenities in the local area, from grocery stores to liquor outlets and gas stations. These, along with the large amount of smaller local shops provide residents everything they need.
There is also abundance of restaurants, bakeries, coffee shops and cafes and even specialty shops, all local, in the neighborhood. Foodies enjoy the choices available in the vicinity ranging from the fine French restaurant Pied A Terre, White Spot to the Dragon Ball Tea House, to a specialty liquor store that just happens to be among the largest in the lower mainland; Landmark Hot Pot House to Henry’s Bistro found in the King Edward shopping center. There are few other places that offer the kind of variety in the culinary world as this neighbourhood. Should there ever be a medical issue, Cambie is filled with facilities to help. The BC Women’s Hospital and Health Center, the BC Children’s Hospital, Shaughnessy Hospital and the headquarters of Canadian Blood Services are a few among the many medical centers built in the area. Vancouver General Hospital is also nearby.
Cambie is home to two Vancouver landmarks – Queen Elizabeth Park featuring the Bloedel Conservatory and The Van Dusen Botanical Gardens on Oak Street. Both are incredible tourist attractions and are often visited by locals as well.

Transportation Options

The north to south arteries, Oak Street and Cambie Street, offer direct routes to all the connecting highways and even a quick route to the Vancouver International Airport and downtown. West 16th and West 41st, the east to west routes offers easy transportation to the Westside campuses of Langara College and UBC. There is no shortage of public transportation options in the area. The Canada Line provides a quick and efficient way to travel to downtown and the airport. The new Canada Line has two stations—one at King Edward and one at 41st avenue and Cambie. It has really increased accessibility to the community.

Coal Harbour

Synonymous with the grandeur of Canada, this tiniest of slivers on the northwestern edge of Vancouver called Coal Harbour is the sumptuous and picturesque beacon of wealth and modernity in Burrard Inlet as seen from the North Shore and the world beyond.

Location

With an angular cut, Coal Harbour is bordered in the northwest by Denham Street and Burrard Street southeast, between W Georgia and Vancouver Harbour.

Schools In The Area

Although no schools are situated directly in Coal Harbour, Lord Roberts Elementary, Roberts Education Centre and King George Secondary are all close at hand in neighbouring West End. Private schools, Pattison High and Westside Preparatory are a little further east, but still within the downtown core. Several of British Columbia’s major post-secondary institutions have campuses nearby, closer to the center of downtown. Of note is the fact that a number of nations, including the United States, Japan, Mexico, and Malaysia have consulate generals in Coal Harbour.

History Of The Housing Market

Named for a tiny vein of coal discovered in 1862, this area of downtown Vancouver was a busy marina for much of its existence. It still is today; however, since the 1990s Coal Harbour has seen some of Vancouver’s most impressive forward-thinking and future-bound developments. In a short 20 years, the area has become home to numerous high-end, high-rise condominiums housing Vancouver’s cosmopolitan elite. This stunning steel and glass jungle towers over Stanley Park in the northwest and the financial district of downtown to the southeast. Not to be outdone, luxury townhomes also dot the area as well. The area holds great appeal for young, upwardly mobile professionals, and wealthy retirees looking to spend their twilight years enjoying the luxury and amenities of Vancouver’s downtown core.

Recreation Opportunities

The Coal Harbour Community Centre offers numerous fitness programs and recreational facilities for all ages. There are also several private facilities and a YWCA on Jervis Street. Astride the seawall, the Centre offers spectacular views of the harbour and the North Shore. The neighbourhood is home to Bayshore West Marina, Coal Harbour Marina, and quaint Harbour Green Park. Aside from providing a place to house ones yacht, the marinas are the launching pads for numerous companies offering cruises and fishing charters. Stanley Park and the seawall are just out ones door, and residents have easy access to all the other recreation offerings in Vancouver’s downtown.

Restaurants & Shopping

Coal Harbour is anchored by both the Vancouver Convention Centre, home to Jack Poole Plaza and the 2010 Olympic flame, and the world-class Westin Bayshore. A number of five-star restaurants are on the menu, as well as a collection of cafés, bistros, salons and spas. As part of downtown, residents of Coal Harbour are only a few steps away from some of the best shopping in Canada, including along famous Robson Street.

Transportation Options

W Georgia Street and Burrard Street are the main thoroughfares that lead out of Coal Harbour to the rest of Vancouver, the North Shore and the Lower Mainland. Traffic in Coal Harbour can be quite heavy, primarily due to the proximity of the marinas. Buses travel along W Georgia and W Pender, and proximity to the Burrard Station on Dunsmuir provides access to the Skytrain. Coal Harbour is also home to the Vancouver Harbour Water Airport, the busiest water aerodrome in the country. Pedestrian traffic in Coal Harbour is fairly substantial as people take advantage of the seawall and traipse around the neighbourhood shops. Cycling is also recommended.

Downtown

As the central financial and business district of the city and the Lower Mainland, downtown Vancouver offers everything to everyone.

Location

The main boundaries that approximately define the central area of Vancouver’s downtown are Burrard Street and Pacific Boulevard to the west and south, respectively, with Main Street and Waterfront Rd (Vancouver Harbour) to the east and north.

Schools In The Area

Although there are no institutions for school age children in the neighbourhood itself, there are several schools in the nearby districts of Yaletown, West Vancouver, and East Vancouver. Vancouver’s downtown is home to number of institutions for higher learning. The University of British Columbia has a campus at Robson Square where students can study Law, Medicine and Business. The campus also has a convention centre containing a library and bookstore. Burnaby’s Simon Fraser University has two important downtown campuses: one located at Harbour Centre on West Hastings and the second just down the block in the Woodwards Building, where SFU students can attend the Faculty of Continuing Studies and the School of Contemporary Arts, respectively. The British Columbia Institute of Technology also has a downtown campus that caters primarily to part-time and international students seeking diplomas in business, computing and media. Two smaller institutions that cater to people with unique ambitions are the Vancouver Film School and the New Image College of Fine Arts, both on W Hastings at Cambie and Richards respectively. The VFS is renowned as a launching pad for graduates who go to work in the local and international film and television industries, including Hollywood. The Vancouver Community College – City Centre Campus (Dunsmuir and Hamilton) is a public college founded in 1965 offering over 140 certificate and diploma programs. Fairleigh Dickinson University, a private American school, has a small international campus located in Yaletown.

History Of The Housing Market

The proximity to Vancouver’s main entertainment districts and commercial buildings are the main draw of living downtown. The central downtown is mainly a mix of upscale luxury high-rises and fashionable townhomes – with availabilities for both buyers and renters.  Pricing is in line with the downtown core of most major cities worldwide.

Recreation Opportunities

Several private downtown facilities, including one owned by an NBA legend, the Steve Nash Fitness Club on Granville Street, offer residents and people working downtown plenty of fitness options. Two major outdoor parks, Andy Livingtone on Expo Blvd and CRAB Park on the waterfront, as well as the smaller Victoria Square (Cambie and W Pender) are located downtown. The former has numerous facilities, including basketball and tennis courts, three playgrounds, and a lighted field for any football or rugby games that extend into the night. CRAB Park has an idyllic view of the harbor and the North Shore, as well as an off-leash area for dogs and a spray playground for the kids. There are other parks along the water just outside of the central core, and Stanly Park and the Seawall are nearby as well. The Chinese Cultural Centre on E Pender and the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden speak to the rich history of Vancouver’s Chinese community and are open to visitors year-round. Vancouver’s two major stadiums, BC Place (home to the Lions and Whitecaps) and Rogers Arena (home to the Vancouver Canucks), are located downtown and are venues for major sporting and entertainment events. Downtown Vancouver has numerous live entertainment venues and cinemas to choose from as well.

Restaurants & Shopping

Central downtown is home to a boundless number of commercial and retail establishments. The main shopping hub is Pacific Centre Mall along Howe Street between Dunsmuir and Robson. Major Canadian retailers share the mall with smaller shops and a food court. Shops, restaurants, pubs, and cafés, including some with reputations that extend beyond Vancouver, can be found along many of the downtown streets. Three distinct areas, Gastown, Chinatown and Japantown, each offer their own respective mix of the eclectic and unique. Vancouver’s Downtown is obviously a transportation hub for the entire region and a fairly high traffic area with commuters and residents coming to and fro all day and night. Major highways lead in and out of the downtown core in all directions. While the streets are navigable, traffic can get congested. Public transit is one option, with buses and the Skytrain offering numerous ways around to and from main pickup points at Central Station, Granville Station, Stadium-Chinatown Station and Waterfront Station. From the latter, the Seabus carries people between downtown and the North Shore. Pedestrian and cycling traffic are heavy in Vancouver’s downtown as well.

Fairview

Location, location, location – that’s what really attracts residents to the Fairview area. It’s in close proximity to both the waterfront and downtown. It offers easy and close access to the sea wall which is great for biking, strolling along or even rollerblading. There is no shortage of recreational activities for residents to enjoy.

Schools In The Area

In the middle of Fairview you will find L’Ecole Bilingue Elementary school. On the western edge of the community you will find Tennyson Elementary and to the north, False Creek Elementary. There are a few secondary schools nearby, Prince of Wales Secondary School and Kitsilano Secondary School. Madrona School, Blessed Sacrament School and St. John’s International School are the private institutions within the area and are only a short distance away. For those who are artistically gifted, the Emily Carr Institute is on nearby Granville Island.

History Of The Housing Market

Due to the increased demand for properties in the area, there has been a noticeable decrease of single family homes and a greatly increased amount of multi-family buildings being constructed. A few smaller industrial areas still can be seen from the views in Fairview and rehabilitated warehouse buildings that offer loft style living, mixed in with commercial venues are quite common.

Location

Fairview goes from West 6th Avenue down south to 16th Avenue. Cambie Street and Burrard Street are the east and west boundaries of the neighborhood, respectively.

Restaurants & Shopping

South Granville: From 16th Avenue down to the Granville Street Bridge there is a large mix of high end retail stores, popular restaurants, coffee shops, antique shops and some art galleries. The Broadway corridor: Being close to VGH and to Fairview, the Broadway Corridor has become a popular shopping area with small boutiques and bigger retail stores as well as restaurants and coffee shops. You can find London Drugs, Future Shop, Pier 1 Imports and even some medical supply stores as well. The Cambie corridor: The eastern border of Fairview has the Cambie Corridor. With the construction of the Canada Line, the corridor has become a busy and high end shopping area. Here you can find popular stores such as Whole Foods, Best Buy, Home Depot, Canadian Tire, Homesense, Winners and Save on Foods. The best part about this is that all of the stores are within walking distance of each other. Granville Island: Next to Fairview is Granville Island. It’s world renowned for its Public Market with fresh produce and specialty items. Also widely known for its variety of studios and art galleries and the Emily Carr Institute, Granville Island is quite the hot spot to see. The island also contains many fine restaurants, a hotel, storefront businesses and a float home community.

Transportation Options

It isn’t hard to find a way to get to or from Fairview. The Canada Line runs right through the Cambie Corridor and can take you to downtown Vancouver one way, and to Richmond in the opposite direction. Public transportation also includes many frequent bus routes and automobile access to downtown and the airport as well as to Highway #1.

Kerrisdale

Originally part of the municipality of Point Grey, prior to amalgamation in 1929, “Kerry’s Dale” was the name of an interurban platform on the old British Columbia Electric Railway. From such humble beginnings as a way station between Vancouver proper and Lulu Island and its canneries, Kerrisdale has grown into one of the city’s more affluent neighbourhoods.

Location

According to residents of Kerrisdale, the neighbourhood stretches from 33rd in the north to West 57th in the south, and is bordered east and west by the Railway right of way and Blenheim Street respectively. There is some dispute over this with the City of Vancouver, which shrinks the boundaries a little, but what no one argues over is that Kerrisdale is gorgeous.

History Of The Housing Market

Primarily made up of single-family detached houses, Kerrisdale is architecturally mixed with a lot of older bungalows in Tudor, Beaux Arts and Spanish Colonial styles alongside newly renovated lots. For renters and first time buyers there are a selection of low-rise and high-rise apartments and condominiums in the area. While a range of prices does exist, housing costs in Kerrisdale generally sit somewhere between lavish and posh.

Recreation Opportunities

The Kerrisdale Community Centre, south of West 41st on West Boulevard, has a number of programs for active children and adults, and offers public swimming, personal training and group fitness classes. For duffers, Kerrisdale is home to two private golf courses, Marine Drive Golf Club and McCleery Golf Course. Eight city parks reside in the area, including the Fraser River Park off-leash dog area and the impressive Kerridale Park with its two hockey rinks, two soccer fields, two baseball diamonds and a running track. The Kerrisdale Business Association (KBA) sponsors a number of annual events including Carnival Days in late April, Kerrisdale Days in early September and Christmas in Kerrisdale each weekend throughout December.

Restaurants & Shopping

The KBA puts a great deal of effort towards encouraging residents to shop local and it has paid off with a most clean and charming community. Indulging ones inner flâneur, Kerrisdale has long been recognized for its well-balanced merger of the eclectic with the essential. In laid-back Kerrisdale Village, one can find all sorts of shops and boutiques, from baby couture to baker’s dozens, major electronics to modest seafood, bicycles and brioche, modern cafés and venerable teahouses, and even window shopping for the urban puppy.

Schools In The Area

For the wee ones, Kerrisdale Elementary, Kerrisdale Annex and several other elementary schools just outside Kerrisdale provide choice and convenience. For teenaged students, Magee Secondary, Prince of Wales Secondary, and the esteemed Point Grey Secondary, alma mater to at least one Hollywood hipster, are each within striking distance. Nearby private schools are the prestigious Crofton House, an exclusive all-girls academy, and York House.

Transportation Options

At the outset, Kerrisdale was a stop-over point between here and there. Today it is a large community with easy transit links to all areas of Vancouver. Commuters have easy access to the downtown corridor by way of Granville Street, SW Marine Drive travels towards UBC in the west as well as all points southeast, and Dunbar leads north to Kitsilano and the beach. Pedestrian traffic is generally confined locally, but cyclists are still within pedaling distance of much of Greater Vancouver.

Kitsilano

Named for a Squamish Chief, “Kits” (as it is known colloquially) is arguably Canada’s most recognizable neighbourhood, its very name conjuring up romantic images in the most stoic minds. A mix of bucolic sophistication and urban primitivism, Kitsilano is home to the very best of what makes Vancouver one of the world’s most liveable cities.

Location

Bordering English Bay in the north, Kitsilano is primarily defined by Alma Street to the west and Burrard Street to the east. W 16th makes up the southern border for the area.

History Of The Housing Market

Home to some of Vancouver’s more prominent current and former denizens, Kitsilano is a very diverse community of single-family dwellings, heritage buildings, low-rise condos, townhouses and apartments for a wide range of tastes and incomes. The market is fairly strong in the area, and there are more rental units than most other Vancouver neighbourhoods.

Recreation Opportunities

Under the paving stones, the beach! Well, just down the road at least. (Don’t tear up the streets.) Kitsilano Beach Park is one of the more well-known, and jealously defended, jewels of Vancouver. With the Kitsilano Yacht Club and pool on one side, and Kits beach on the other, this park provides year-round respite to residents and tourists with its beach volleyball, tennis courts, basketball courts, ample jogging and hiking paths, etc. The Kitsilano Community Centre on Larch Street provides a number of indoor activities for residents of all ages. A number of Vancouver’s more popular cultural centres reside in Kitsilano, specifically in Vanier Park: the Maritime and Vancouver Museums and the HR MacMillan Space Centre. Some annual cultural events include the Khatsahlano Street Party and the Shakespeare Festival “Bard on the Beach”

Restaurants & Shopping

Kitsilano residents and visitors take full advantage of the area and its myriad shopping bazaars. Along W 4th and West Broadway major shopping areas, full of salons, haberdasheries, shoe stores and enough haute couture to occupy even the most discerning fashionista.  Second hand stores, niche clothing boutiques, antique shops, organic markets, wine stores, boulangeries and delis appeal to more bawdy tastes. Several world class restaurants and bistros dot the landscape of West 4th alongside more traditional fare. The downtown core and the Granville Island Public Market are also nearby and huge favourites of the Kits crowd.

Schools In The Area

There are a fair number of elementary schools in Kitsilano for young children, including the epochal Henry Hudson Elementary, while Bayview Community School, General Gordon Elementary and Lord Tennyson Elementary round out the available public options. For older students, Kitsilano Secondary is in the heart of Kits, while Prince of Wales and Lord Byng are an easy commute. Private institutions include St. Augustine Elementary, the independent St. John’s (K-12), and St. John’s International Secondary on West Broadway.

Transportation Options

Commuting to downtown, or UBC, by car, bus or bicycle is easy for residents of Kits. W 4th, West Broadway and W 16th are the major east-west routes running through Kitsilano, while Granville, Arbutus and McDonald handle most of the north-south traffic. Downtown is just across both the Burrard Street and Granville Street bridges while UBC is just a short trip up W 4th. Public transportation in the area is frequent. The City of Vancouver is currently implementing a plan that will greatly enhance the current ease with which pedestrians and cyclists travel between downtown and Kitsilano. Traces of the hippie era remain, such as the vegetarian eatery called the Naam Café on the corner of MacDonald and 4th Avenue. Three pubs from that era, boasting the some of the first pub licenses issued in the city of Vancouver, still operate, all on 4th Avenue. It probably is not all that surprising that Greenpeace got its start, and opened its first office, in Kitsilano, as did British Columbia’s Green Party. Festivals abound in Kitsilano. In June, Greek Day is celebrated in the area’s Greektown. Jericho Beach Park hosts the Vancouver Folk Music Festival each summer. And the words of Shakespeare flow freely each year at Vanier Park’s outdoor festival honouring the Bard.

MacKenzie Heights

The residents of this west-side enclave have long kept the charms and intrigues of Mackenzie Heights to themselves, but word is getting out: this quaint little residential neighbourhood might just be as sleepy as it seems (and it’s a good thing). Offering enviable views of downtown, English Bay and the North Shore Mountains, Mackenzie Heights is just as picturesque looking outwards as inwards.

Location

Comprising the western portion of Arbutus Ridge, Mackenzie Heights is nestled between Kits and Kerrisdale, Dunbar and Shaughnessy. Its borders are Blenheim in the west and Larch in the east, King Edward up north (taking a dip along Quesnel Drive) and W 37th in the south.

History Of The Housing Market

Mackenzie Heights has long oriented towards single-family dwellings. Often generous in proportions, many of these houses are situated on spacious, tree-lined streets and offer fantastic views. Older homes have are generally well-kept and newer homes are respectful of the overall aesthetic. Newer developments are well-thought out in advance to ensure symmetry with the neighbourhood. Never showy, Mackenzie Heights has a demure reservedness about its wealth.

Recreation Opportunities

A focal point of Mackenzie Heights is the beautiful Balaclava Park providing residents with an off-leash dog area, a wading pool for the kids, a rugby pitch, a running track and space for ultimate Frisbee. Along with Memorial Park West and Chaldecott Park, Balaclava Park enjoys year-round activity.

Restaurants & Shopping

Essentially a residential community, Mackenzie Heights has limited retail options within its proper boundaries. A tiny block of well-known niche shops on Mackenzie Street is the most on offer. However, Arbutus Shopping Centre is just to the west in Shaughnessy while Kerrisdale Village is within walking distance to the south.

Schools In The Area

While Mackenzie Heights has no public schools itself, the greater area of Arbutus Ridge is home to both Carnarvon and Trafalgar Elementary schools, the latter which offers a well-established French Immersion program. Prince of Wales Secondary also lies within Arbutus Ridge, while Point Grey Secondary and Magee Secondary are within close proximity. A number of private academies are within short driving distance, including Little Flower Academy (BC’s only all-girl Catholic secondary), Immaculate Conception, the all-girls elementary school Crofton House, York House, and Vancouver College. The private-school St. George’s Elementary is the only school located in Mackenzie Heights proper.

Transportation Options

Mackenzie Heights offers a fairly easy commute to downtown and UBC. Public transportation is limited, but available. It is a nice, safe neighbourhood for a slow stroll or a slower bike ride.

Marpole

Marpole is a vibrant residential area at the southern tip of Vancouver and one of the region’s oldest settlements. Originally agrarian, the railway brought industrialization and people in the early 20th century, and Marpole was amalgamated with Vancouver in 1929. The area expanded considerably from the 1950s through the ‘70s with the opening of two important bridges, Oak Street and Arthur Laing.

Location

A neighbourhood in the southern reaches of Vancouver proper, Marpole is close to Mitchell Island, the City of Richmond and the Vancouver International Airport. It is bordered by W 57th Avenue in the north and the Fraser River in the south, from Ontario Street in the east to Angus Drive in the west.

History Of The Housing Market

Built primarily in the Boomer years, Marpole sees a healthy mix of single-family dwellings, low-rise condos and a variety of rental properties. Its industrial origins continue to be evident in its multicultural character, having long been synonymous with affordability and upward mobility. With a number of heritage buildings, Marpole maintains a very real link with the past, and has a number of senior’s residences including Marpole Place and the George Pearson Centre.

Recreation Opportunities

Priding itself on active community engagement, Marpole is home to the Oakridge Community Centre, as well as the local Soccer and Baseball Clubs. The Marpole Curling Club is one of the most active in the nation. Publically run and operated Langara Golf Club is open to all golfers. With Shannon and Riverview parks in the west, the terraced Winona Park in the east and centrally-located Oak and Eburne Parks, residents have an abundance of green space to while away the day.

Restaurants & Shopping

The epicenter of retail activity in Marpole is located along the Granville Street corridor. Like much of Vancouver, smaller, local neighbourhood businesses stand alongside major retail anchors. The Marpole Business Improvement Association promotes the area as an excellent place for an epic stroll, taking the time to leisurely expose oneself to a wide variety of shops and restaurants, particularly the wealth of fine Asian cuisine.

Schools In The Area

Laurier Annex, David Lloyd George, J.W. Sexsmith, Sir Wilfrid Laurier and McKechnie Elementary schools provide plenty of options for young children, while Sir Winston Churchill and Magee Secondary lie just outside of Marpole’s borders and serve the needs of older students. Several independent schools such as St. Anthony of Padua, the Vancouver Hebrew Academy, Glen Eden, and Vancouver Montessori cater to the aspirations of Vancouver’s diverse community.

Transportation Options

Commuting to and from all areas of Greater Vancouver from Marpole is easy. Major arterial routes include Granville and Cambie running north-south and SW Marine Drive running east-west. The City of Richmond is accessible by Route 99, while the Vancouver Airport is just down Grant McConachie Way. Marpole is frequented by a number of public transit routes. Pedestrian traffic is primarily local and cyclists will find the commute a bit of an adventure.

Oakridge

Centrally-located Oakridge is one of the smaller and younger communities in Vancouver. Originally home to little more than a golf course and a hospital, Oakridge began to come into its own in the 1960s as one of the original suburban enclaves built around a shopping centre.

Location

Rectangular in shape, Oakridge runs from Granville Street in the west to Main Street in the east, along W 41st in the north and W 57th in the south.

History Of The Housing Market

Only now entering middle-age, Oakridge is still very much characterized by its suburban roots. The area mainly consists of single-family dwellings on comparatively large lots. There are a limited number of apartment complexes available for renters, but they are less expensive than other areas of the city. As the region ages, Oakridge has become home to several assisted-living residences that cater to the older population who want to continue to enjoy the comfortable lifestyle on offer in Oakridge.

Recreation Opportunities

Predating Oakridge by several decades is the pristine and public Langara Golf Course. Playable and affordable, the course is open year-round, which is fairly unique for Canada. Aside from the golf course, Oakridge has a few smallish outdoor parks: Montgomery, Tisdale and Columbia. The Langara Family YMCA provides a number of indoor recreation programs for families and children.

Restaurants & Shopping

Oakridge Shopping Centre is the focal point of retail activity in Oakridge. Anchored by major chain stores and a multiplex cinema, this commercial paradise offers Vancouverites substantial convenience in one easily-accessible location. The stores and restaurants on offer reflect the relative affluence of the area and cater to every desire. Adjacent to the Centre itself are the Oakridge Towers, home to medical offices and pharmacies. pharmacies are plentiful in the Oakridge Centre Towers. The shopping experience is enhanced by several smaller strip malls that complement the larger Centre.

Schools In The Area

As Oakridge is smallish in nature, schools in the neighbourhood are generally within walking distance. The largest institution in the area is of course Langara College on E 49th, adjacent to the golf course, which caters to young adults seeking higher learning. Sir Winston Churchill Secondary on 57th and the private King David High School instruct adolescents, while Sir William Van Horne and Sir William Osler intern the little ones. Just south of Oakridge are Sir Wilfrid Laurier Elementary and J.W. Sexsmith Elementary, while north of 41st is École Sécondaire Jules-Verne and Vancouver College. There are also two Montessori preschools: Forget-Me-Not and Montessori World.

Transportation Options

Given its central location, Oakridge sees a lot of commuter traffic, primarily north-south along Granville, Oak, Cambie and Main. Downtown, UBC and the City of Richmond are all easily accessible from Oakridge. Public transit is frequent and robust, and the recent addition of two Skytrain stations on the Canada Line (41st/Cambie and 49th/Cambie) has really enhanced the flow of people to and from the area. Pedestrian traffic is limited, primarily to the shopping centre. Cyclists will find the location of Oakridge makes their commute relatively easy.

Point Grey

Comprising the greater portion of Point Grey (along with UBC endowment lands and parts of Kits), Point Grey is one of Canada’s more upscale and captivating neighbourhoods. Named for Captain George Grey, friend of the city’s namesake George Vancouver, and home to Jericho Garrison, Point Grey has a wealthy history steeped in tradition and Anglophilia.

Location

Offering incomparable views of the ocean (Salish Sea), Point Grey is defined by Spanish Bank Creek and Blanca Street to the west, 16th Avenue in the south, Alma Street in the east and NW Marine Drive along the beaches of English Bay. It is Vancouver’s westernmost neighbourhood prior to UBC and its endowment lands.

History Of The Housing Market

Thanks in large part to sensible and prescient zoning bylaws, Point Grey was originally conceived as a residential neighbourhood only, with gracious lots and large single-family homes. Opportunities to purchase property in Point Grey were limited. Modern zoning bylaws have since become more accommodating to newcomers with affordable housing and increased density, but in all fairness, Point Grey is not the kind of neighbourhood one looks to buy a home unless one is specifically looking to buy a home in Point Grey, if you follow. Privilege is its own reward. Current plans call for any changes to be primarily located along main corridors, combining street-level commercial space with higher-end residential units above. Rental units are not common and are usually generously priced.

Recreation Opportunities

Adventurers and nature lovers make Point Grey a year-round haven. With over 55 km of trails on nearly 2000 acres, the sumptuous Pacific Spirit Park is perfect for hiking and dog walking, biking and even horseback riding. Along English Bay lie three spectacular beaches: Jericho, Locarno and Spanish Banks, all popular places for sunbathing and picnicking, sailing and paddle surfing, and more. The Jericho Sailing Club (locally famous for its fare and its view) and the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club each offer plenty of activities for mariners and seafarers. Originally a swimming club, the Jericho Tennis Club is a prestigious racquet club with high quality facilities and an absolutely gorgeous view of the water. The Brock House offers elegant programs for active seniors, as well as Lunch at Brock House. Operated by the Point Grey Community Association and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, the Community Centre on W 2nd Avenue provides a number of quality leisure services, including pottery classes, swimming and aerobic instruction, tennis courts, foosball and pool for the teens, summer camps for children, a licensed preschool, afternoon teas and Breakfast with Bunny. Also co-operated with the community, the city, and the United Players of Vancouver Theatre Company is the Jericho Arts Centre (JAC). This local theatre company performs 5 productions a season in a 135-seat venue located near Jericho Beach, just off NW Marine Drive. Home to Theatre Terrific, a non-profit group that empowers youth and adults with mental and physical disabilities to tread the boards, the JAC is an essential player in Vancouver’s lively theatre scene. Just west along University Drive is the University Golf Club and driving range.

Restaurants & Shopping

Although primarily residential by design, Point Grey does offer a smattering of commercial enterprises that people can feel are one’s own. At the corner of 10th and Alma resides an eclectic stew of antique shops and novelty stores interspersed with small euro-style cafés and even smaller restaurants. Farther along 10th, between Tolmie and Discovery, is the main commercial strip with grocery stores and more affordable fare. Of course, Kitsilano is right next door and makes up for anything Point Grey may be missing.

Schools In The Area

Elementary school age children may attend Queen Elizabeth Elementary, Queen Mary Elementary or École Jules Quesnel. For adolescents, Lord Byng Secondary and Our Lady of Perpetual Help are within the boundaries of Point Grey. The private and highly-esteemed West Point Grey Academy (PreK-12) and Pacific Spirit School (K-7), a flagship program of the New Learning Society, are situated next door to Jericho Garrison. Just west of the neighbourhood is one of Canada’s preeminent post-secondary institutions, the University of British Columbia (UBC), with 50, 000 well-behaved students. (Don’t worry, the forest acts as a buffer).

Transportation Options

Traffic in Point Grey moves primarily east-west along W 4th, W 10th and W 16th. Commuting to the downtown core is fairly easy, for both driver and cyclist alike. In large part due to its proximity to UBC, West Point Grey is amply serviced by public transportation. Pedestrian traffic is usually confined to ramblers, beachcombers and discombobulated professors taking a leisurely stroll, coffee in hand and head in the clouds, on their way to class.

Quilchena

Quilchena, along with Arbutus and Mackenzie Heights, comprises part of the Arbutus Ridge area of Vancouver. Originally marshy, the neighbourhood was one of Vancouver’s first major engineering feats, as the land was filled in with sand hauled from False Creek. In a way, Quilchena is almost beach front property.

Location

The curvy boundaries of Quilchena involve King Edward Avenue in the north, with Larch and Puget Drive to the west and Marguerite Street to the east. The area is anchored along W 37th as its southern fringe.

History Of The Housing Market

The area has a mix of single and multi-family units, and has a certain multi-generational appeal. One of three neighbourhoods in Arbutus Ridge, Quilchena itself is further divided into three neighbourhoods of its own, each with a fairly distinct flavor. The area bordering Shaughnessy has larger estate houses, and shares its elegance with the neighbourhood to the east. The second prominent area grew up around the Arbutus Village Shopping Centre and is mainly low and mid-rise multi-family dwellings. There are also several high-rise complexes capitalizing on Quilchena’s quiet and relatively easy commute. A third distinct enclave of affordable single-family detached homes is built around Prince of Wales Park. The area offers some impressive mountain and water views. The appeal of this housing mixture of attracts single families, seniors and young people to Quilchena. Both buyers and renters find Quilchena reasonable and attainable.

Recreation Opportunities

The abundance of greenery that attracts people to Quilchena is no more evident than in fabulous Quilchena Park. Originally leased by Quilchena Golf Club, the land was taken over by the city in the 1950s. The eastern portion was transformed into an exquisite spectacle of rolling lawns and lofty trees, making the park a great place for a quiet stroll or to grab lunch. Quilchena Park has two baseball diamonds, two soccer fields, a jogging path, playground, an off-leash dog area and a full skateboard park. Quilchena is also home to Arbutus Village Park and the Arbutus Village Recreation Centre. The landmark Arbutus Club on Nanton Avenue is a venerable Vancouver icon. With a wide range of facilities, it is one of Canada’s premier private clubs.

Restaurants & Shopping

The Arbutus Shopping Centre is a major hub for the entire Arbutus Ridge region. Anchored by a grocery store and pet store, it offers all the amenities including clothing and other retail goods. It is also home to a niche patisserie, a chocolatier and a tobacconist, for that old-world flavour. Just down the road is a little seafood store that attracts people from all over Greater Vancouver. There are plenty of restaurants and coffee shops either in Quilchena itself or close enough in the neighbourhoods next door.

Schools In The Area

Quilchena Elementary is the main elementary school in the area, with a student body that reflects Vancouver’s diversity. It also offers a highly-touted French Immersion program (K-7). Kerrisdale and Shaughnessy Elementary schools are to the south and east respectively. Prince of Wales Secondary on Eddington Drive and Point Grey Secondary on W 37th are the main choices for local adolescents. Noted private schools, York House, Vancouver College and Little Flower Academy, are in neighbouring Shaughnessy.

Transportation Options

Quilchena’s major arterial route runs north-south along Arbutus Street. It is the principle connector for residents to all of the Lower Mainland. Public transit is quite good, accessible and frequent. Pedestrian and cycle traffic are mainly a local affair.

Shaughnessy

Primarily residential, Shaughnessy was originally designed as an alternative neighbourhood for the nouveaux riches who weren’t partial to the West End. A landscape architect from Montréal and an engineer from Denmark collaborated on the design for the neighbourhood’s spacious boulevards and serene crescents. Shaughnessy still proudly identifies as a refuge from the rigors of urban life.

Location

The geographic heart of Vancouver, Shaughnessy is contained between Angus and Oak, with little bumps and wrinkles here and there, from W 16th Avenue in the north to W 41st Avenue in the south.

History Of The Housing Market

Shaughnessy’s original architects imbued the area with classic British and early American styles. Vancouver is currently developing a plan to preserve many of these pre-1940s houses and encourages new home planning, including multi-family townhouse developments, to complement Shaughnessy’s distinct character. The neighbourhood bears the fruits of its initial design in single-family homes on large lots. Pricing has kept abreast of the major trends in Vancouver, and rental units are scarce.

Recreation Opportunities

By design the streets of Shaughnessy are safe for strolling, biking and year-round road hockey. Containing several parks, including Shaughnessy and Devonshire, the area is best known as home to the VanDusen Botanical Gardens, a sprawling 55-acre showcase for Vancouver’s love of the verdant and vibrant. This public venue exhibits art in the garden and has an annual Festival of Lights each December. The Vancouver Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club lies just north of Shaughnessy in Granville Park.

Restaurants & Shopping

Conceding to its residential design, Shaughnessy has very little commercial property. However, the Arbutus Village Shopping Centre is just to the west and Oakridge Shopping Centre is just to the south. Together they provide all the convenience and amenities a shopper would desire. There is a delightful mix of shops and restaurants along Oak Street, and north of Shaughnessy are the wares of South Granville Rise.

Schools In The Area

Shaughnessy Elementary is the only public school in the area, but Quilchena Elementary and Carr Elementary are close enough to offer residents choice of schooling. Although no public secondary schools are in Shaughnessy, Eric Hamber Secondary lies just to the east, while Prince of Wales Secondary and Point Grey Secondary lie west and southwest respectively. Private schools in Shaughnessy include Vancouver College, York House, the Little Flower Academy and the Vancouver Talmud Torah on the eastside of Oak Street.

Transportation Options

Although initially devised as a hideaway in the heart of the city, residents of Shaughnessy still have convenient access to the rest of Vancouver. Downtown is a 15 minute commute up Granville, while the airport is 15 minutes down the other way. Oak Street provides another route south to the airport, and into Richmond and other communities. Public transit options consist mainly of major routes travelling along Granville and Oak. Pedestrian traffic is confined locally, while travelling to and from downtown by bike is fairly straightforward.

South Cambie

Not to be confused with the new South Cambie (or Cambie), the real South Cambie is actually in the southern portion of Vancouver, a smallish, well-groomed neighbourhood south of Oakridge and north of Marpole.

Location

From Oak to Ontario, South Cambie is bordered in the north along 49th Avenue and in the south along the N Arm Trail Greenway (59th Avenue).

History Of The Housing Market

Single-family units and townhouses make up the bulk of dwellings in South Cambie.  One of the premier properties is Langara Estates adjacent to Langara Golf Course. With abundant green space and broad private roadways, the Estates include townhouses and low-rise condo buildings in harmony with standard houses. Long imitated (and sometimes duplicated), Langara Estates provides the blueprint for many newer developments in the Lower Mainland.

Recreation Opportunities

Langara Golf Course and its trail, occupies the eastern edge of South Cambie. A city-owned course open to the public, Lanagara offers affordable pricing and is a favourite of Vancouverites. Cambie Park is a modest affair lying across from the golf course, while Tisdale Park is just to the north in Oakridge. The Marpole Oakridge Community Centre (Oak Street/W 59th) offers a wealth of recreation and fitness programs for area residents of all ages.

Restaurants & Shopping

As small as it is, the neighbourhood of South Cambie has no distinct retail climate of its own. However, Oakridge Centre, with its chain stores, retail shops, and large multiplex, is just to the north and serves the residents well.

Schools In The Area

On 49th, between Alberta and Ontario, Langara College and its environs take up much of the northeastern corner of South Cambie. An institute of higher learning, it is the choice of many young adults throughout Greater Vancouver. Sir Wilfrid Laurier Elementary and J.W. Sexsmith Elementary are in South Cambie proper, while B. Jamieson Elementary lies just to the north of W 49th.  Sir Winston Churchill Secondary is the only high school in South Cambie, but several others are within easy commuting distance. King David High School in Oakridge is the nearest private secondary.

Transportation Options

The main commuting thoroughfares for cars, bicycles and public transit are Oak Street and Cambie Street. Running the north-south corridor, the streets are fast and easy access routes to the major highway network, leading to the Vancouver International Airport, the City of Richmond, and the rest of the Lower Mainland. Public transportation is significantly augmented by the Canada Line travelling along Cambie Street, with a station at 49th. Pedestrian and cycling traffic are primarily local affairs, heaviest around Langara College and the neighbouring golf course.

South Granville

Since its first developments in the early 1900s, this serene neighbourhood tucked away in the heart of Vancouver has long attracted upwardly mobile families with its combination of respectful grandeur and ideal situation.Stately, elegant, primarily upper middle-class residential neighbourhood tucked quietly away in the heart of Vancouver. Not too far from all the action of the downtown core, but far enough to preserve the old world serenity.

Location

Bisected by Granville Street and bundled between Cypress Street to the west and Oak Street in the east, the environs of South Granville stretch from W 64th (southwest) and Park Drive (southeast) northward to 41st Avenue.

History Of The Housing Market

South Granville is chiefly a residential neighbourhood catering to families seeking a home of their own. The original residences can be quite stately, situated on large lots along sylvan streets. Over time, the need for more reasonable and accessible accommodation drove development of townhouse-style enclaves, low-rise condos, and a smattering of rental units. Newer and new-ish developments have always paid respect and homage to the pristine plan for the area. Rents in the area are reasonable while pride of ownership is the reward for hard-work.

Recreation Opportunities

Montgomery Park in the northeast section and Shannon Park in the southwest are the primary green spaces in Granville South. Oak Park lies just outside the boundaries to the east in Oakridge. These public parks provide a great deal of green space, including playgrounds, sports fields, and trails for everyone who enjoys the outdoors. Marpole Oakridge Community Centre is nearby, just southeast of the neighbourhood, and offers a wide array of indoor recreational facilities and programs for residents of all ages.

Restaurants & Shopping

Not to be confused with the South Granville shopping district to the north of Shaughnessy, the neighbourhood of South Granville does not have its own unique commercial identity. Smaller shops and restaurants, convenience stores and gas stations are dotted here and there along the main roads. The main retail district lies to the south at Granville and W 70th and has a number of establishments meeting the family’s standard needs, i.e. grocery store, liquor store, banking, etc. (although not necessarily in that order).

Schools In The Area

South Granville has a dearth of educational institutions in the immediate area as Sir William Osler Elementary is the only neighborhood school. However, neighbouring communities harbor any number of choices for young and adolescent school-age children. Maple Grove Elementary and Magee Secondary are just west of Cypress Street, while Sir Wilfrid Laurier Elementary and Sir Winston Churchill Secondary are just east of Oak Street. Dr R.E. McKechnie Elementary lies just to the southwest.

Transportation Options

Granville Street cuts South Granville in two and is the main north-south corridor running through the neighbourhood. It is the usual route for travelling to and from downtown, as well as points south of the main city. Public transit is ample, operating primarily along West Boulevard, Granville and Oak (north/south), W 41st and W 49th (east/west). Getting to UBC and Langara College are relatively easy. Pedestrian traffic is minimal, while commuting by bicycle can be a bit of trek.

Southlands

The neighbourhood of Southlands allows one to have a country lifestyle along the waterfront. It is a prestigious area of many estates, but also has urban farmland. There are show homes on the westside that showcase the area as well.  There are plenty of single-family homes, shopping areas and parks to choose from.

Schools In The Area

Many of the people who live here are part of the single-family demographic. There are many institutions in close proximity to choose from when it comes to education—Southlands Elementary, Kerrisdale Annex, Kerrisdale Elementary and McKechnie Elementary. This gives parents the opportunity to choose the best place for their children. For older kids, there is the Point Grey Secondary and Magee Secondary. There are also a few private schools if one wants to go that route, and these include the Crofton House, Immaculate Conception School, St. George’s School, the Vancouver Montessori School and Glen Eden School. The University of British Columbia is also only 10 minutes away from Southlands.

Location

The community of Southlands is an enclave of the Lower mainland, with the Fraser River being a natural southern boundary and the UBC Endowment Lands anchoring the northwest corner of the vicinity. SW Marine drive is the northern boundary for Southlands and Angus Drive is on the eastern boundary. Southlands has a history with the neighborhood of Dunbar to the North. They both started off as a logging area in the 1900s. At first it was uninhabitable because of the falling trees. Later on with efficient town planning, the Westside became accessible in the 1920 – then housing construction began. These houses needed to be put on a lot, with many of the original homes standing today. Most of the neighborhood was built before 1946, and even though heritage homes have taken predominance over the area, the place is still a mix of old beauty and modern renovations.

History Of The Housing Market

Southlands is a unique neighborhood since the housing shows the eclectic population of both this area and the neighbouring area of Dunbar. Another area has the Musqueam Indian Reserve, which have homes on long-term land leases. The west Southlands has mainly single-family houses on impressive lots. It has a rural quality as well with stables attached to estate homes—giving the sense of a country lifestyle while still being close to the city.

Recreation Opportunities

Most of the residents in this area live close to a park. There are over 2.07 hectares of park per 1000 people—this is almost double the norm in the city. There are two golf courses in the area as well, but most of Southlands is green space with walking areas and sports activity places.

Restaurants & Shopping

Located in Southlands is one of the best garden nurseries in the city. The Southlands Nursery is perfect for anyone who wants to be a gardener— it is ideal for anyone of any skill set. Along with this are three shopping districts—the one on 41st Avenue allows one to get old-time trinkets and other interesting things. On Arbutus, there are shops that have everything, from delis to hip clothing restaurants. The neighbouring community of Dunbar also has restaurants, grocery stores, shops and even a movie theater. A Southlands’ resident can get everything they need, in one convenient and beautiful place!

Transportation Options

Southlands has a public transit that takes commuters downtown. There are also well-kept roads for automobiles and cyclists. No freeways are available, but there are three routes for vehicular traffic commuting to downtown—these routes hook up with the freeway routes by the Lower Mainland. There is also the Vancouver International Airport close by.

SW Marine

SW Marine is an elegant area that is highly understated. It’s quiet and perfect for those who want to get away. The area comes with beautiful homes having a myriad of trees and beautiful lots—it’s one of the more appealing characteristics of the neighbourhood.

Schools In The Area

SW Marine is about 99% residential, which means that it will have many educational institutions to choose from. There is Maple Grow Elementary, McKechnie Elementary, Sir Wilfred Laurier and David Lloyd Elementary in its borders. A little outside the border is Magee Secondary School, which helps older children nourish their minds as they look forward the future. The private schools in the area are Glen Eden and Vancouver Montessori School. If one wants to check out other private schools, there is the Crofton house and Vancouver Hebrew Academy within easy driving distances.

Location

The areas around the community are 49th Avenue, which is up north, West Boulevard that turns into Granville Street in the East, SW Marine Drive in the West, and 70th Avenue to the south. SW Marine is an interesting neighborhood because it is secluded, despite being easily accessible by the cities westside. The tree-lined streets help to border this quiet area in Vancouver.

History Of The Housing Market

Most of the homes in the area are for those with a higher income potential than other areas of the city. The biggest demographic of homes in SW Marine are single-family homes on large lots. The reason why these homes are so big is because most were built before 1946 and they show off the elegance of time prior to that. The lawns are also well taken care of and the trees are very healthy. Some of the most iconic houses in Vancouver can be seen in this area, including the Cases Mia.

Recreation Opportunities

SW Marine has a lot of green space and that’s the biggest recreation aspect of the area. There three prominent parks in the community, namely Riverview Park, Maple Grove Park and Arbutus Park. They are all perfect for joggers and those who want to partake in recreational sports. The Marpole Community Center is the indoor recreational facility in the area. There are many popular programs to choose from. The community also has two prestigious golf courses where some of the best in the sporting arena engage in the world’s oldest sport.

Restaurants & Shopping

There are no commercial shopping centers in the SW Marine area; however, on the Eastern Border there is a shopping district on 70th avenue. A large grocery store, liquor store, and multiple gas stations provide amenities to the community. On the northern borderline are other unique shops, restaurants and coffee places to check out. Residents may also find banks, insurance and doctor facilities.

Transportation Options

SW Marine is a main transportation hub that allows one to travel to any of the outlying areas connecting the Lower Mainland. Most of the travel is done by car, which allows people to commute from east and west without issues. If one doesn’t have a car, there is still a public transportation system—the bus system offers convenient stops allows in downtown and the surrounding areas.

University

This is an elite community surrounded by beautiful greenery.  Vancouver is well known for the preservation and cultivation of nature to beautify the land. It started out as a logging area in the 1800s, and it had many different branches and trees that could be harvested.  Now, 100 years later, the logging industry has changed and many people use those areas as parks.
The neighborhood came about with the University Endowment Land Act of 1907. This set apart the land for development by companies later on, and was made official in 1989 with the opening of the Pacific Spirit Park. This neighbourhood was set aside and was later changed into an area that now has about 2800 residents. This area is suburban but also has the beautiful and idyllic feeling that many area of Vancouver has to offer.

Schools In The Area

There are many schools in the area, which is fitting since the area is called University. There is the University Hall Elementary that caters to the younger kids and the Lord Byng Secondary and the University Hill Secondary School that help to further the education of teenagers. If one wants to go to a private school, then they can choose from St. George’s or Westside Christian School. The University of British Columbia is, of course, located in the community as well.

Location

The University community allows one to feel the city life without having to be around the busy nature of a city. No matter where you are, you only have to walk a little to get to the unbridled beauty that is the city of Vancouver.

History Of The Housing Market

The housing in the area is diverse and caters to every demographic. There are student accommodations for the university crowd along with homes that are for those who are of the middle to high-income bracket. Due to the premier land value, there are very prestigious homes in this neighbourhood, with many of them valued in the million of dollars. There are also homes for those within a smaller price bracket, including multi-family townhouses with secondary suites. This allows average income earners to live in the area despite the high costs of living.

Recreation Opportunities

In the community one can check out the Museum of Anthropology to help satisfy their curiosity, or the UBC Botanical Garden for something a bit different. There is also the Nitobe Memorial garden, which is a Japanese garden. Pacific Spirit Park allows one to explore different trails that cater to nature hikers, dog bikers, walkers and even horseback riders. On the western tip there are two beaches of the Lower Mainland ideal for jogging, sports or simply relaxing.

Restaurants & Shopping

There are different mall complexes that are being changed into multi-level housing. Even so, these malls cater to every household item a University resident may need and this makes the area a sustainable community. With the help of the neighborhood association, this community is able to thrive and give residents whatever they need.
There are also different shops and restaurants by the University of British Columbia campus that allows one to have more variety. There is also a small shopping area on Dunbar that is only a small commute from the area.

Transportation Options

The area is about thirty minutes away from downtown, offering a scenic view on the way to the airport. The transit system helps cater to the large student population in the area.

West End

Historic and bustling, the West End is uniquely positioned to appeal to the omnivorous urbanite with a nature-loving temperament. Originally staked out for its clay, the area was once Vancouver’s first upscale neighbourhood, before the likes of Shaughnessy and Kerrisdale usurped that role. Over time the West End became more inclusive and inviting, and its diversity is one of its stronger selling points today.

Location

The West End neighbourhood of Vancouver’s downtown has a relatively trapezoidal shape, with its main boundaries travelling up Burrard Street, west on W Georgia towards Stanley Park and the Lost Lagoon, then heading south on Park Lane (or Denman Street, depending on whom one asks), and back towards the Burrard Street Bridge along Beach Avenue parallel to the Seawall (English Bay).

History Of The Housing Market

The West End offers a wide array of mid-rise and high-rise buildings, for buyers and renters alike. There are also many older and renovated single-family units. Tree-lined streets and quiet green spaces offer some buffer between the business of the neighbourhood and homelife. Like much of the Lower mainland, the area has seen an upswing in condo developments as part of Vancouver’s growth and urban planning. The area remains equally attractive to all ages and groups, to newcomers and longtime Vancouverites, who are drawn to the downtown core and Stanley Park. Prices trend upwards, but reasonable, and in return people who choose the West End get the full Vancouver experience.

Recreation Opportunities

The West End Community Centre, a 50,000 square foot facility/library on Denman Street, and the Vancouver Aquatic Centre, on Beach Avenue, over local residents plenty of indoor recreational and cultural activities. There are two outdoor parks within the neighbourhood itself, centrally-located Nelson Park and beautiful Sunset Beach Park where False Creek meets English Bay. Just up the Seawall from Sunset Beach is English Bay Beach, home to Vancouver’s Celebration of Light fireworks display each summer. Of course, one of Vancouver’s main attractions is just west of the West End: the majestic Stanley Park. This veritable Eden offers all of Vancouverites year-round proximity to nature and its bounty. Its multitude patchwork of trails offers endless enjoyment for hikers, joggers and cyclists, while facilities exist for playing tennis, lawn bowling, rugby, pitch-and-putt: the list is inexhaustible.

Restaurants & Shopping

Davie, Denman, Robson: the triumvirate that comprise the essential commercial district of the West End. With an eclectic mix of the hallowed and profane, these streets, especially Robsonstrasse, are well-known for their offerings of haute couture and world-class amenities. The area has no shortage of restaurants, delis, pubs, and cafés; shops and salons; supermarkets and department stores; theatres, live and cinematic; hotels and hostels. Arguably the liveliest neighbourhood in Vancouver, the West End is where the polis meets the cosmos.

Schools In The Area

Vancouver’s West End is home to a number of schools, including Lord Roberts Elementary, Lord Roberts Annex and eminent King George Secondary.  Pattison High and Westside Preparatory are two of the area’s private options. The University of British Columbia’s faculties of Law and Medicine, as well as its Sauder School of Business, offer courses at the downtown campus at Robson Square (just east of Burrard Street). There are also branches of the UBC library and bookstore. Also close by are downtown campuses for BCIT (on Seymour), offering a whole panoply of courses, and Simon Fraser University (on West Hastings), notably its School of Contemporary Art and the Morris J. Wosk Dialogue Centre. The downtown campus for SFU also houses the Segal Graduate School of Business.

Transportation Options

Travelling throughout the Lower Mainland is almost as easy as stepping out the front door for inhabitants of Vancouver’s West End. Stanley Park Causeway leads northwest to the Lions Gate Bridge and the cities of West Vancouver and North Vancouver, and on to Whistler, while W Georgia heads east towards Highway 99 and 1A (east of downtown). Public transit in the form of buses, the Skytrain and Canada Line will take anyone from the West End to UBC, the Vancouver International Airport, and the various environs south and east of the city. Pedestrian and cycling traffic are dense owing to the Seawall and the local commercial district. Today this densely populated and ethnically diverse part of Vancouver is a draw for singles and families of all ages. Robson Street provides endless shopping and dining possibilities as well as a number of high-end hotels. Two elementary schools, Lord Roberts and the Lord Roberts Annex, service the area. The King George High School is also within the borders.

Yaletown

Originally one of the city’s industrial neighbourhoods, since Expo ’86 Yaletown has undergone one of the continents more spectacular regenerations, and is today one of Vancouver’s more densely-populated yet desirable neighbourhoods.

Location

Essentially bordered by False Creek and the Stanley Park Seawall to the south, Yaletown carves out a sliver of downtown from Burrard Street Bridge in the west along Pacific Boulevard to Carrall Street in the east.

History Of The Housing Market

A thin 200+ acres, this urban oasis offers some of the best waterfront real estate in Vancouver. Until rezoned in the 1980s, the neighbourhood avoided the initial wave of high-rise developments, and because it has come relatively late to the game, Yaletown today has a very clean, freshly-minted look and virtually shimmers with modernity. Appealing to the active and affluent urban dweller, Yaletown’s state-of-the-art townhouses and condos share the streets with a number of warehouses-cum-loft-style apartments, combining to make it one of the more lively and extravagant areas of the city.

Recreation Opportunities

One of the primary appeals of Yaletown, indeed much of the Lower Mainland, is the proximity to the out-of-doors. Numerous parks dot either side of False Creek, with Creekside, Coopers, David Lam and George Wainborn properly calling Yaletown home. David Lam Park is well-known for its floral gardens, plaza, and tidal pool. The Stanley Park Seawall runs along the entire southern boundary of Yaletown and is an excellent place for a stroll, a jog, or a bike race. Bring friends. Dedicated to cultural development, the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre on Drake Street offers a range of art, cultural, and recreation programs. Nearby BC Place is a multipurpose stadium and home to the BC Lions Football Club of the CFL, Major League Soccer’s Vancouver Whitecaps FC and the BC Sports Hall of Fame.

Restaurants & Shopping

One of Vancouver’s newer shopping districts, the area has taken advantage of the old warehouses not only for residences, but for unique boutiques, cheerful curios, sassy salons, and welcoming bars and eateries. There are also several grocery and produce stores, as well as local bakeries, delis and drycleaners. Of course, the famed Granville Island Market is just a short trip across the water.

Schools In The Area

The Elsie Roy Elementary school, in the heart of Yaletown, is one of the newer institutions in the downtown corridor. Lord Roberts Elementary and King George Secondary are not too far away in neighbouring West End. Private schools in Yaletown include Pattison High and Westside Prep. A number of off-campus faculties offered by Lower Mainland colleges are located in Vancouver’s downtown, close to Yaletown. The University of British Columbia and the British Columbia Insitute of Technology both have a fairly substantive presence, and Simon Fraser University has several programs on offer as well.

Transportation Options

Driving in Yaletown requires some finesse; however, many residents forego owning an automobile as transit, cycling and pedestrian options abound. Commuting throughout downtown is facilitated by numerous public transit options, including the Canada Line. Buses and the Skytrain travel to all points in the city and beyond. The Aquabus ferries people along False Creek to and from Granville Island. Pedestrian and bicycle traffic are quite heavy as people take advantage of Vancouver’s safe downtown core.