Champlain Heights

As part of Killarney, Champlain Heights is one of the youngest divisions of Vancouver. The neighbourhood is half winding roads and cul-de-sacs, and half green space. It’s easy to see why it has such broad appeal for singles and young families.

Schools In The Area

Captain James Cook Elementary and Champlain Heights Community School serve children from kindergarten through Grade 7. Champlain Heights Annex is a smaller institution that only serves K-3. Older students generally attend Killarney Secondary or David Thompson Secondary.

Location

Champlain Heights is a small outcropping sitting in the southeastern-most corner of Vancouver. Between Kerr Street and Boundary Road, the area is nestled between E 54th Street to the north and the shores of the Fraser River in the south.

History Of The Housing Market

The demography of Champlain Heights is split right down the middle between renters and owners. The majority of single-family detached and attached row houses were built in the 1970s and 1980s. As much of the land is leasehold property, more townhomes and high-rise apartment blocks have sprung up over time, including the newer Fraserlands development along the Fraser River. Pricing for buyers starts out affordable, but it can climb fairly quickly depending on the lot and style.

Recreation Opportunities

Comprising roughly one-third of the total area of Champlain Heights, Everett Crowley Park is a 40 hectare green sanctuary noted for its trails, off-leash dog area and Avalon Pond. It is also home to Champlain Heights Community Centre, which has courts for racquet sports, a playground and a youth lounge. Captain Cook Park with its wide paths and two tennis courts sits adjacent to Everett Crowley and extends across Champlain Crescent into Sparwood Park. Kinross Ravine Park is a smaller pocket of wilderness on the southern fringe of Champlain Heights, and is bisected by Marine Way. The River District Beach Volleyball courts on Riverwalk Avenue are a coed venue operated by Urban Rec.

Restaurants & Shopping

Champlain Mall, or mini-Mall, at the corner of Kerr and E 54th, has many of the amenities a growing community needs. It is part of the larger Champlain Square, which is home to a sizeable grocery store, a liquor store and a branch of the Vancouver Library.

Collingwood

Collingwood started out as a trail leading from New Westminster to English Bay and grew up over the years, first around a stop of the interurban railway line and later with the introduction of Vancouver’s Skytrain. As a place of coming together, Collingwood exudes pride in its active community spirit and sees its fair share of the hustle and bustle that makes the lower mainland such an exciting place to live.

Schools In The Area

Public schools that serve the neighbourhood include George T. Cunningham Elementary, Sir Guy Carleton Elementary, Sir Wilfred Grenfell Elementary, Graham Bruce Community Elementary and Collingwood Neighbourhood School. Although no secondary schools reside in Collingwood proper, Windermere Secondary is just to the north in Renfrew Heights and Killarney Secondary is just to the south.

Location

The southern section of Renfrew-Collingwood stretches from E 29th down to E 41st (and the Kingsway) and is bordered on the west by the curve of Nanaimo Street and east by Boundary Road and Burnaby.

History Of The Housing Market

One of the fastest growing residential neighbourhoods in Vancouver, Collingwood enjoys a near even split between apartment-type dwellings and single-family detached homes, with the majority of residents being homeowners, not renters.  The architectural style is reflective of the lower mainland: sturdy and pleasant, secure and inviting. Pricing is attractive for working middle-class families looking for a place to settle and grow.

Recreation Opportunities

As with most of Vancouver, Collingwood has its fair share of outdoor green spaces for residents to enjoy. Some of the smaller parks like Carleton and Cariboo are essentially just playgrounds for children, but larger parks such as Collingwood and Gaston have soccer fields and basketball courts. Norquay Park has an outdoor water/spray park for children. Collingwood Neighbourhood House is a central hub of community activity that offers numerous recreation activities for all ages. Burnaby’s large Central Park, home to Swangard Stadium and a fine Pitch and Putt, lies just to the southeast of Collingwood. The Collingwood BIA puts on the Collingwood Days Festival, including an Art Crawl, each May to celebrate the richness and diversity of the neighbourhood.

Restaurants & Shopping

The Collingwood Business Improvement Association, encompassing nearly 350 local enterprises, is situated along Kingsway from Rupert to Boundary. It is the major commercial district catering predominantly to the ethnically diverse, family-oriented denizens of Collingwood and its visitors. The Metropolis at Metrotown, one of the lower mainland’s larger shopping malls, is just a short commute down the Kingsway in neighbouring Burnaby.

Transportation Options

Commuter traffic travelling from and through Collingwood is fairly heavy, especially along the main corridors: Kingsway and Boundary. Public transit is essential to the motility of area residents, with regular bus service and a main Skytrain station at Joyce-Collingwood. Even with a major bike lane running along Vanness Avenue, cycling is more for pleasure than business. Pedestrian traffic is generally light and local, although it can be fairly dense around the business district.

Fraser

Fraser is a vibrant and dynamic Eastside neighborhood that is ethnically rich. The community within Fraser proudly welcomes and embraces diversity into this close-knit neighborhood.

Schools In The Area

The educational opportunities for the children and young adults in Fraser are just as diverse as its residents. This dense single-family neighborhood offers multiple public and private schools that are accessible to its residents.
Sir Alexander Elementary, Livingstone Elementary and McBride Annex are some of the elementary schools that are in the area. Henderson Elementary is another school that is located outside the southern border of Fraser. Sir Charles Tupper Secondary and John Oliver Secondary School are well established schools for young adults—they are both located in the northwest corner of the Fraser community. Private schools in the area include Khalsa School, St. Andrews School and Vancouver College. These private schools offer the residents of Fraser the opportunity to send their children to the school of choice without having to travel outside of the community they live in.

Location

The neighborhood of Fraser is divided down the center by Fraser Street—the main street in this community. The north edge of the neighborhood is East 16th Avenue and the south edge is East 49th Avenue. The western and eastern borders are Elgin Street and Prince Edward Street. There are few sections of Ross Street and Glen Drive that are also part of the Fraser neighborhood.

History Of The Housing Market

Most of the dense single-family homes in Fraser were built prior to 1946 on large lots of land. These homes are ideal for families with young children and retirees that enjoy the quiet. Bungalows and “Vancouver Specials” built during residential development in the 80s are plentiful in Fraser. Recent development in this community has focused on multi-family strata units, low-rise and townhouse complexes the desire for these types of dwellings.

Recreation Opportunities

Fraser has two local recreational facilities and green space to serve the needs of the community. Grays Park is located on East 33rd Avenue and covers a 1.61 hectare site. The features of this park include two tennis, a basketball court, lawn bowling greens, a wading pool and a ball hockey area. Memorial South Park is a large recreational facility that is located further south of Greys Park in the Fraser area. This park is recognizable by the ceremonious War Memorial that is located at near entrance of the park. Memorial South Park was opened in 1926 and has developed over the years to meet the needs of the residents in the community and local sports organizations. This park features sports fields, a pond and a six-lane running track. The sports field is built with synthetic turf that is able to handle soccer, field hockey, lacrosse and ultimate Frisbee. Whippet racing was the original attraction when Memorial South Park was opened.

Restaurants & Shopping

Fraser Street is the heart of this community and where you can find a vivacious shopping area full of local shops, grocery chains and national drug stores. This 9 block shopping area between 41st and 50th Avenues hosts food stores and restaurants as ethnically diverse as the residents in the community. The South Hills Business Improvement Association promotes this residential shopping area and offers a complete directory of the business.

Transportation Options

Fraser is in the center of the major transportation systems in the area that offer travel options north to Downtown, south to Richmond and to all areas that surround the Fraser community. The arterial routes in this community allow for fast and easy transportation routes for those who travel by car or have the desire to use public transportation.

One of Vancouver’s oldest residential neighbourhoods, Fraserview began to truly come into its own in the post-War years with the baby-boom and earned the cutesy nickname of “diaper-town”. It has benefited from a minor Renaissance in the latter half of the 20th century attracting a new wave of young Vancouver families to this ideal area.

Schools In The Area

The south Vancouver region has numerous educational options for young families, with many elementary schools available in the neighbourhoods of Killarney (Champlain Heights), Victoria, and Sunset. Within Fraserview proper the choices are limited to David Oppenheimer Elementary and David Thompson Secondary. The Sir James Douglas Annex on Borden Street offers a French Immersion program for K-3 while École Anne-Hebert, operated by an independent school board, offers full French matriculation K-6.

Location

Sitting along the Fraser River in the south-eastern portion of Vancouver, Fraserview is bordered in the west by Knight Street and in the east by Kerr Street. The northern boundary runs along East 54th Street.

History Of The Housing Market

The area is a mix of single-detached houses, duplexes and walk-up apartments that date back the middle of the last century. The architecture is generally Vancouver Special: functional and sturdy. High-rise developments spring up closer to the water, as newer condo developments can be found on the river side of SE Marine Drive. The cost for buyers and renters is affordable and attractive for young families and first-time buyers.

Recreation Opportunities

The main recreational attraction in the neighbourhood is the Fraserview Golf Course, ranked as one of the best public courses in all of Canada. A traditional-style links hidden away behind an urban forest and overlooking the Fraser River, the park attracts not only duffers, but sightseers traipsing along its perimeter pathway. The Golf Institute at Fraserview offers reasonably priced lessons for newcomers to the game.

Bobolink Park, home to South Vancouver Family Place, is a large, open area place to play. The SVFP is a non-profit organization that specializes in programs for families with young infants. Gladstone Park and Riverfront Park are popular destinations along the Fraser River.

The Boys and Girls Club of Greater Vancouver, offering recreational programs for youth of all ages, is located on Victoria Drive.

Restaurants & Shopping

There is a large commercial area situated near the Knight Street/SE Marine interchange with a number of retail outlets and home improvement stores. Champlain Square, on Kerr Street, also serves the area with some smaller shops in Champlain Mall, as well as the Punjabi Market in nearby Sunset. Residents of Fraserview also take advantage of their close proximity to the City of Richmond and its shopping malls.

Transportation Options

A large majority of local suburbanites who commute to work do so by car. Knight Street, leading to and from Richmond as well as downtown, is one of the busier traffic corridors in Metro Vancouver. SE Marine Drive handles most of the east/west traffic coming out of Fraserview. Busses travel along Knight Street and Victoria Drive, but commuters choosing this option will have to be prepared to transfer. There is no SkyTrain service running through Fraserview. Cycling and walking are usual just a local affair.

Hastings

The ideal neighbourhood for middle-income earners can be characterized by affordability and accessible to major surrounding cities. Hastings has the perfect price point and Downtown Vancouver is accessible by arterial roads and public transit. Hastings is the perfect place to call home for any family.

Schools In The Area

Hastings hosts a number of amazing public schools and a well respected private school, which can be expected from a longstanding family-based neighbourhood such as this. Lord Strathcona Elementary, Admiral Seymour Elementary, Dickens Elementary, Brittania Elementary, Lord Nelson Elementary and Macdonald Elementary are all located in the neighbourhood or just outside the borders. The middle and secondary school that most Hastings residents send their children to is Templeton Secondary. The St. Francis of Assisi is available for residents that would prefer a private or independent school.

Location

Hastings southern boundary is where East Hastings Street is located. East Hastings Street runs along the south of the neighbourhood from Main Street on the western edge to Clark Drive, than it moves south to Venables Street, and finally rests at Nanaimo Street on the eastern edge of the neighbourhood. The Burrard Inlet is an amazing water’s edge that sits on the northern edge of the neighbourhood stretching from Main Street to Nanaimo Street.

History Of The Housing Market

With a mixture of high-rise buildings, rental units and multi-family homes, Hastings offers a wide variety of dwellings that are priced for lower-income singles to middle-income families. A significant number of homes in the area were built before 1946, and the 1970’s and 80’s brought a surge of new development to the Hastings community. This industrial waterfront is becoming one of the desired residential neighbourhoods in the area. The single-family homes in the area include small bungalows, Vancouver Specials and wonderful heritage homes. The artistic edge of the neighbourhood can be found on Railway, Powell and Alexander Street where the loft buildings and work/live studio spaces are located. Renovations of older properties and new housing have started to find a place in Hasting due to the revived interest from a young generation.

Recreation Opportunities

The open green spaces and recreational facilities in Hastings are beautiful. Pandora Park is characterized by the stone walls and magnificent trees that surround it. Shaded walking paths, open grass fields, a tennis court and a playground for young kids are some of the wonderful features of Pandora Park. Next to Templeton Secondary is a beautiful open park and community swimming pool that are the main features of Templeton Park. The open fields encompass sidewalks and paths for the residents to either go for a jog or walk their dog.  The building that houses the Templeton Pool is eclectically decorated by the hand painted titles of the Hastings residents. The Woodland Park offers large open fields, a playground, a beautiful garden, a field house and a section of the park is dedicated to the First Nation art. A totem garden that is an amazing site to see alongside traditional and contemporary First Nation sculptures is some of what can be experienced at Woodland Park.

Restaurants & Shopping

The retail experience in Hasting is a mix of traditional retail outlets and artistic driven neighbourhood shops. Shops, coffee shops and different ethnic restaurants can be found in block-long strips in this community. Within a short distance from the residential area are drug stores, grocery chains and other national shopping chains that service the residents.
The art studios and live/work spaces that line Powell Street and Clark Drive has created interest in the artistic community of the area. The annual Eastside Culture Crawl brings thousands of visitors to Hasting ever November. During this weekend over 300 artists open their studios to the public. Eastside Culture Crawl has helped to revive the image of the Hasting community.
Just east of the Historic District of Gastown located along Railway and Alexander Street are diverse shopping, eating and drinking establishments. One of the historical areas in Hastings is Japan town where marvelous restaurants, historical buildings and corner markets selling produce can be found. Some Vancouver institutions call Hastings home including Nick’s Spaghetti House, Waldorf Hotels and the Gourmet Warehouse.

Transportation Options

Public transportation is not hard to find in Hastings. Bus routes that transport passengers to Downtown are easily accessible and allow for quick transport. Drivers can take Powell Street and Hastings Street that run east to west to get into and out of Downtown. The Second Narrows Bridge takes drivers to North Shore and Cassiar Connection or Highway to the Lower Mainland areas. There is also the Adanac Bikeway or the Lakewood Bikeway for the biking enthusiast.

Killarney

Killarney is one of the last neighbourhoods to be developed in Vancouver proper and has resisted being labeled and pegged down as one thing or another, although the Emerald District will do nicely.

Schools In The Area

Families of younger children have a fair choice of elementary schools. There’s Tecumseh on E 41st, Waverley and Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith on Elliot Street, Dr. George M Weir on Rupert Street and Dr. H.N. MacCorkindale on Battison Street. There are several others to choose from in nearby Champlain Heights. For teenagers, there’s Killarney Secondary and David Thompson Secondary nearby.

Location

The area of Killarney (not including Champlain Heights) is bordered by Argyll Street in the west and Boundary Road in the east, roughly between E 41st (north) and E 54th (south).

History Of The Housing Market

Killarney benefits from modern planning and architecture, with wide boulevards, tree-lined and pedestrian-friendly, and a clean, contemporary look. The area offers a mix of housing, roughly split evenly between single-family detached, attached row houses, and walk-up apartments. Pricing for both buyers and renters is fairly reasonable.

Recreation Opportunities

The Killarney Community Centre is a modern facility with a large gymnasium, ice rink and fitness centre. Residing in Killarny Park, the community centre offers a number of programs for active people of all ages and is quite popular with residents from all over Metro Vancouver’s southeast region. It is home to the Killarney Skating Club, a Skate Canada sanctioned group that offers a figure skating program and private lessons. The park itself is a remarkable green space with a number of ball diamonds and soccer fields, as well as a running track and an off-leash dog area. Nanaimo Park is another sizeable green space in Killarney noted for its baseball diamonds, while Gordon Park offers numerous fields for play. Central Park is right next door in Burnaby.

Restaurants & Shopping

The area doesn’t have a unique commercial presence. Killarney Centre is a small retail outlet on E 49th and there are a number of small enterprises here and there along the major roads. Collingwood’s main commercial area, shared by proximity with Killarney, is in the north along Kingsway. Champlain Mall is in nearby Champlain Heights and Metropolis at Metrotown is a short drive or bus ride to Burnaby.

Transportation Options

The majority of commuters in Killarney travel by car. The major north/south thoroughfares are Victoria Drive and Boundary Road, with Rupert Street picking up some of the slack. Both Kingsway and SE Marine Drive are easily accessible from Killarney, which lead downtown and all points east/west, respectively. There is no access to the Skytrain in Killarney proper, but there are major bus routes along Rupert, Tyne, E 41st and E 49th. Several of these routes lead to Joyce Station on the Expo Line. Bike lanes exist on Vivian Drive and E 45th. Pedestrian traffic mirrors Killarney and moves at a leisurely local pace.

Knight

The hard-working and multi-cultural Eastside community of Knight is located near Vancouver’s downtown and offers an easy commute to locations east and south of the area. This community is comprised of successful middle-class families.

Schools In The Area

The educational institutions available in the Eastside neighbourhood of Knight include schools for all ages. Dickens Annex, Sir Sanford Fleming Elementary, McBride Elementary, Tecumseh Annex and Tecumseh Elementary are some of the Elementary age schools that are located in Knight. The middle-school and secondary school options include Gladstone Secondary and John Oliver Secondary David Thompson Secondary schools. Private and independent schools such as Stratford Hall, Khalsa School, St. Joseph’s School and St. Andrews are within a short commute for the residents of Knight and offer some of the finest education in the area.

Location

Knight is bordered to the north by East 16th and to the south by 54th Avenue. The neighborhood runs over to Elgin Street to the west, veers at East 49th Avenue and reaches Knight Street which will run down to the southern border. Knight Street bisects the neighborhood of Knight and is one of the main north to south arteries of Vancouver.

History Of The Housing Market

Knight has a variety of single-family and multi-unit residential options. Vancouver Special style dwellings on large lots of land are among the homes found in this neighbourhood. These 1946-60 style homes are mixed with the development of the 1980’s, newer townhomes and mid-rise condos. The development of Knight is due to the desire for quality homes that are close and within easy travel of the Lower Mainland. Knight has become an attractive location for younger singles and families because of the location and affordability.

Recreation Opportunities

Kensington Park located in Knight is one of the most exquisite parks in the Lower Mainland. A new community centre and a retro-style bowl skateboard park are two of the main features of Kensington Park. The community centre includes a fitness center, pottery studio, dance studio, preschool education center, a swimming pool and a gym. The center was expanded in 2001 to include an area for a senior’s lounge and other community programs. Kensington Park is said to have one of the most spectacular views of downtown and the north shore.
The community of Knight is also close to Memorial South Park located in Fraser, Clark Park to the north and Kingcrest Park located to the south. Memorial South Park has a field that is perfectly suited for multiple sports including soccer. Clark Park’s basketball courts, tennis courts, soccer fields and baseball diamond are located north on East 14th Avenue. Kingcrest Park includes open space, picnic area, off-leash dog area, playgrounds and an ultimate-frisbee playing field completed in 2005. The recreational facilities in the Knight area offer for a vast number of activities for the residents of this community.

Restaurants & Shopping

Knight Street is the central hub for grocery/produce stores, pharmacies and small local boutique stores for the neighbourhood of Knight. These shops are alongside high-quality restaurants that offer ethnic food to residents at reasonable prices. Knight is surrounded by a vast number of grocery chains, liquor outlets and drug stores to further service the residents. Building of new shopping and restaurants in the Knight neighbourhood is planned for the future.

Transportation Options

The transportation available to the residents of Knight is bountiful. The Knight Street Bridge located in the southern border of the neighborhood allows for access to the major routes of the surrounding areas.

Main Street

This trendy and hip Eastside neighborhood of Vancouver is none other than Main Street. Residents of Main Street enjoy the great shops and amazing restaurants that this affordable community has to offer its residents.

Schools In The Area

Main’s educational facilities are perfect for this traditional single-family neighbourhood. Wolf Elementary, Brock Elementary, Livingstone Elementary and Van Horne Elementary are the four closest elementary schools to Main. Sir Charles Tupper Secondary is the local secondary school located on the eastern edge of Main. Sir Winston Churchill Secondary and Sir John Oliver schools are both located just outside the borders of Main and are secondary school options for the residents inside the Main limits. St. Andrews School, Khalsa School and Vancouver College are the private/independent schools that are accessible to the residents living in the Main neighbourhood.

Location

The rectangular area of Main is located on Vancouver’s Eastside border. The neighbourhood is surrounded to the north by East 16th Avenue, to the east by Prince Edward, to the south by East 49th Avenue and to the west by Ontario Street. This neighbourhood is traditionally an older single-family area, but is being established by residents of all ages over recent years. Young multi-cultural singles, upper middle-class couples and families have flocked to the Main due to the desire to buy homes that are accessible and affordable.

History Of The Housing Market

The majority of the houses in Main were built prior to 1946 as detached single-family homes. The demand for high-quality and affordable housing with quick transport to the downtown core has brought a recent surge of development to the area. Low and mid-rise multi-unit buildings as well as townhouse developments have been a welcome addition to the community. Further development of Main has been proposed that would expand the character of the neighbourhood. The development proposal for the area between 33rd and 37th is set to include retail shops, a child care facility, at least seven residential towers and playground. The new development will have a positive impact on the community and the families that live there.

Recreation Opportunities

Main has multiple small parks and green spaces for the residents in the community. Riley Park is one of the larger parks in the district which includes two playgrounds, a baseball diamond, a unique climbing boulder, wading pool and open space for a number of other outdoor activities. Residents of the area can find numerous programs available for all ages at the Riley Community Center.

Restaurants & Shopping

Main has an eclectic assortment of shopping and restaurant establishments alongside the traditional grocery chains, insurance facilities, banks and liquor stores. The selection of independently owned boutique stores are unlike anything in the Greater Vancouver area. They offer residents a variety goods and services right in the community. The area of Main Street and King Edward offers numerous ethnic restaurant choices, which is why residents are calling it “restaurant row.”
The well known “Punjabi Market” is located on the southern border of the community. The center of the market rests at Main Street and 49th Avenue and then extends south for many blocks. The market is know for the amazing selection of foods, clothing, spices and other native Indian and South East Asian products.

Transportation Options

Main is known for being close to the downtown core and has plenty of accessible routes. There are multiple public transportation choices in the neighborhood that travel frequently through the city and surrounding areas. Main is in close proximity to the Canada Line means that area residents are some of the best served by the local public transportation system.

Mount Pleasant

Take a brief tour around one of Vancouver’s more sophisticated, lively and central neighbourhoods and let its charisma enthrall.

Locationv

Mount Pleasant is nestled between Clark and Cambie, situated along the False Creek waterfront up north to 16th Avenue in the south. Historically situated along Brewery Creek in the late 19th Century, Mount Pleasant experienced its first significant growth in the post-WWII Baby-Boom era. As the second wave of suburban families moved outwards to the sprawl, first students and artists, and later, young urban professionals, moved into Mount Pleasant. Today it is that combination of youthful energy and lust for life that gives this old neighbourhood its modern electricity.

History Of The Housing Market

A liberal mix of detached homes, low-rise buildings and condo complexes, the area has a wealth of options for renters and buyers alike. Experiencing strong economic growth, the neighbourhood has seen a swell of development as multi-story condos and lofts grace the skyline of late. Keeping ahead of the times has long been an attraction of Mount Pleasant.

Recreation Opportunities

The City of Vancouver has been working hard on a broad plan to promote and preserve the cultural identity and heritage of Mount Pleasant. The area is the proud home of Vancouver City Hall, a main branch of the Vancouver Public Library, and a neighbourhood skate park. A recent addition, and fast becoming a favourite hang-out for the fit crowd, is a new neighbourhood community centre located on Kingsway. This upscale multipurpose facility features a gym, a rock wall, fitness instructors, dance lessons and yoga studios. For the sunshine crowd, Mount Pleasant is full of options. Loaded with parks and enough community gardens to keep the greenest thumb busy, the area is alive. Tea Swamp Park, Jonathan Rogers Park, China Creek North and South, Guelph Park, Fraser Street Park, and Sahalli Park, all complement each other by offering recreational spaces throughout Mount Pleasant to promote a healthy and vibrant lifestyle.

Restaurants & Shopping

Main and Broadway is the commercial epicentre of Mount Pleasant. While local coffee shops, niche boutiques, arsty entertainment venues and world-class restaurants offer choices to more eclectic tastes, Mount Pleasant is presence to a wide variety of global chains. Successful and identifiable enterprises have enjoyed a sharp growth lately, giving the neighbourhood that familiar feel. Like a nice slice, it’s all in the spice.

Schools In The Area

Mount Pleasant is home to a number of well-known educational institutions. Founded in 1891, Lord Strathcona Elementary is one of the oldest schools in Vancouver, and is presently attached to a community centre and library. There are a few well-heeled private schools in the district, as well as three public elementary schools for families with young children. For older children, there are secondary schools just outside Mount Pleasant in neighbouring districts. For the college bound, Vancouver Community College and the Great Northern Way Campus ensure a steady stream of future artistic creators, entrepreneurs and leaders get a taste of Mount Pleasant life.

Transportation Options

Centrally-located and just south of downtown, Mount Pleasant is ideally situated for commuters. With a wealth of transportation options just outside every door, the ease with which residents can access other areas of the Lower Mainland is an essential quality about Mount Pleasant. For commuters, Main Street is a major artery of Metro Vancouver, aligning Downtown with the North Shore, Marine Drive, and neighbourhoods south of the Fraser River by way of both the Knight and Oak Street Bridges. Public transportation to and from all areas of Mount Pleasant is constant. Travelling east to west, the B-Line bus service makes getting back and forth from UBC campus a nice and tidy excursion. Within walking distance of the Skytrain’s Expo and Millennium Lines, as well as the Canada Line, outlying areas become quickly accessible from Mount Pleasant. For the globally conscious bikers and hikers, there are designated bike routes and pedestrian walkways throughout the neighbourhood.

Renfew

With its mountain views and multicultural character, Renfrew has long been a hustling, bustling hive of activity and growth in East Van.

Schools In The Area

Notre Dame Regional Secondary School is an independent institution situated in the northern part of Renfrew and Vancouver Technical Secondary is a public high school located in the southern portion. Primary schools are abundant in the district, and include Dr AR Lord Elementary, Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary, Chief Maquinna Elementary and the aforementioned Thunderbird Elementary. The Art Institute of Vancouver and the Vancouver College of Dental Hygiene are also located in Renfrew, benefitting perhaps from their proximity to the Vancouver Film Studios in Renfrew.

Location

Renfrew is an older designation for a fairly large neighbourhood that comprises the southern portion of Hastings East (south of the East Village) and the northern part of Renfrew-Collingwood. Square-shaped, it is bordered by Nanaimo Street, E Hastings Street, Boundary Road and Grandview Hwy.

History Of The Housing Market

Renfrew is not unique for its generous curb appeal, well-developed lots, and huge potential, each of which it has in great abundance, but rather for its marked affordability. One of Vancouver’s earliest developed suburbs, Renfrew remains one of the city’s more reasonably accommodating markets. Particularly attractive are a number of the newer condo developments that have grown up around access to the Skytrain. On the whole, the district is a mélange of single-family homes, condos and apartments.

Recreation Opportunities

Charles Park in Hastings-Sunrise is a quaint little green space for quiet reflection and bird watching. A couple of smallish parks, Kaslo Park and Thunderbird Park, offer residents playgrounds and tennis courts. Clinton Park and Sunrise Park up the ante a bit by offering soccer fields, ball diamonds, and an off-leash dog area at the latter. The prize of Renfrew, however, is Rupert Park, a dawn-to-dusk, 11 hectare urban jungle with fields for soccer, football, rugby, 4 tennis courts, and Vancouver’s most notoriously frustrating Pitch-and-Putt golf course. The Adanac Park rests adjacent to Adanac Park Lodge, a community care centre, and Thunderbird Community Centre, attached to Thunderbird Elementary, offers programs designed primarily for children.

Restaurants & Shopping

Befitting its suburban nature, the commercial climate of Renfrew is more meat and potatoes than champagne and fois gras. Major retail establishments like Superstore, Wal Mart and Canadian Tire can be found along Grandview Hwy and Boundary Road. Brentwood Town Centre is also close at hand in nearby Burnaby. Smaller establishments can be found here and there, with most being situated along E Hastings Street.

Transportation Options

The major east/west commuter thoroughfares are E Hastings, E 1st, and E Broadway, with travel to and from downtown being quite heavy and taking a good half-hour. The Trans-Canada Hwy also cuts through Renfrew, while Boudary Road is the primary north/south corridor. Busses travel along Nanaimo, Renfrew and Rupert streets, as well as E 22nd Avenue. There are busses along Boundary, Rupert and Renfrew Roads, as well as E Hastings and E Broadway. The Skytrain’s Millenium Line is accessible at both Renfrew and Rupert Stations. There are bike lanes along Adanac Street, Slocan Street and the Central Valley Greenway. Pedestrian traffic is fairly thin.

South Vancouver

Comprising what was once the district of South Vancouver, plus a little extra, colloquially named Sunset is an ethnically-diverse, immigrant-rich neighbourhood brimming with vibrancy and energy. Historically associated with Vancouver’s industrious past, Sunset is where the enterprising Nouveau Middle Class choose to live in the 21st century.

Schools In The Area

Elementary schools in the district include John Henderson, George Moberly and Pierre Elliott Trudeau.  St. Andrew’s Elementary is the lone independent school in the area. John Oliver Secondary is the only high school in the district, but there are several others in nearby neighbourhoods.

Location

Nestled between Marpole and Fraserview, Sunset is bordered west and east by Ontario Street and Knight Street respectively. Its northern boundary is East 41st and the Fraser River runs along the southern edge.

History Of The Housing Market

South Vancouver is a relatively quiet neighbourhood primarily made up of duplexes and single-family detached homes. Functional and practical architecture takes precedence over unwise and unsound design. Pricing is attractive for people who know the value of a dollar, and the majority of residential properties are owned, not rented.

Recreation Opportunities

The Sunset Community Centre, just south of East 51st on Main Street, is a modest facility with an ice rink, a dance studio, fitness instruction and a playground. It also offers out-of-school care. The Moberly Arts and Cultural Centre is another smallish venue in Moberly Park (along Prince Albert Street) with a studio theatre and herb garden, and it offers programs for Vancouverites to (re)discover their creative, artistic side. MacDonald Park, George Park, Ross Park and Sunset Park are four smaller outdoor green spaces where locals go. Memorial South Park along East 41st is a larger 14 hectare venue that offers soccer fields, ball diamonds, tennis courts, as well as facilities for cricket, lacrosse, and field hockey. Sunset is also home to a unique 6-block Indo-Canadian business and cultural area running along Main Street, known as the Punjabi District. Its main focal point is the India Gate on Main and 50th and the local Sikh community celebrates Vaisakhi each April with a parade that attracts tens of thousands of viewers and participants.

Restaurants & Shopping

Transportation Options

Commuting is easy enough via Main Street and Knight Street, both of which lead to the Kingsway. SE Marine Drive is a major thoroughfare that leads both to the west and all points east of Vancouver proper. Public busses regularly service Sunset, running north/south along Main, Fraser, and Knight directly downtown, and east/west along E 41st, E 49th, and SE Marine Drive, which link up with the Skytrain. Pedestrian and cycling traffic are generally a local affair.

Victoria

Victoria offers a diverse multi-cultural flare to its residents. This vivacious neighbourhood is located on the eastside of Vancouver.

Schools In The Area

Victoria residents are open to a wide variety of educational opportunities in this family oriented neighborrhood. John Norquay Elementary, Tecumseh Elementary, Laura Secord Elementary, Tecumseh Annex, Cunningham Elementary, Lord Selkirk Elementary and McBride Elementary are some of the outstanding elementary schools in the area. Vancouver Technical, John Oliver Secondary, Gladstone Secondary, Killarney Secondary and Sir Charles Tupper are the middle and secondary school options for the community. The well respected private and independent schools that are available to area residents include St. Joseph’s School and Stratford Hall. Other private and independent schools that are near the community are Fraser Academy located to the north, Our Lady of Sorrows to the east, St. Andrews School and Khalsa.

Location

The area is bordered to the north by 16th Avenue, to the west by Perry Street which becomes Argyle Street, to the south by 41st Avenue and to the south by Victoria Drive continuing to 24th Avenue. The neighbourhood also plunges east in the direction on Stainsbury Avenue and Nanaimo Street.

History Of The Housing Market

The dwellings in the community were built primarily during either before 1946 or in the 1980’s when there was a revived interest in developing the area in and around Victoria. The 1980’s development was partially due to the desire of middle-class families to be near downtown, to have easy access to transportation routes and retain the feel of living in a suburban neighbourhood. The recent years have brought the development of low-rise and mid-rise multi-units structures as well as townhouse development. The community is filled with established families, young couples, and an influx of young families.

Recreation Opportunities

On the northern edge of Victoria is the alluring John Henry Park and Trout Lake that offer programs, facilities and activities to the nearby residents. The community center and field areas have been recently renovated. Located at the corner of Victoria and East 26th Avenue is Brewers Park. This park is separated into three distinct areas. The first includes a tennis court and a basketball court. The second area is a grassy space including a playground and wading pool. The thirds area is an open space used for jogging, dog walking and picnic area. The park was named after the first president of South Vancouver, William Brewer. Just outside the border is Clark Park, which is the second oldest park in all of Vancouver. This park features ball hockey field, basketball court, soccer field, softball diamond, playground, tennis court and a water park area.

Restaurants & Shopping

Around 41st and Victoria is a stretch of over 4 blocks full of retail and restaurant establishments. Small neighbourhood stores where you can find amenities and specialty items as well as coffee shops and ethnic restaurants make the area an experience for everyone. The neighbouring communities of Killarney and Champlain Heights offer grocery chains, banks, national drug stores and liquor outlets to the surrounding neighborhoods.

Transportation Options

The main route north to south of Victoria Drive combined with the east to west routes of 16th and 41st Avenues allows residents easy and quick transportation routes to wowntown, the north shore and other areas in the Lower Mainland. There are also a number of public transportation options that frequently pass through the community.